La Divina Commedia

I’m trying to beat my self-imposed deadline and I’m really glad to finally say that I’ve finished The Dante Club (by Matthew Pearl)!

The book is actually really good. There are some problems with the pacing and the reader may feel really confused and slightly bored during the first half. But the pace picks up later on, and the separate knots somehow go all together. The characters are beyond compare. I love the fictionalized real-life poets that compose The Dante Club itself that I’m thinking of buying a few goldfishes and naming them after the literary group. Imagine having pets named “Henry Wadsworth Longfellow” and “Oliver Wendell Holmes”. Hehe.

Anyway, the book is not recommended for anyone looking for a typical everyday thriller. The Dante Club may have been marketed as one but it is not! The book is heavily intellectual, with the pages filled with descriptions of Dante Alighieri’s La Divina Commedia, particularly those concerning The Inferno. The way the mystery is solved is particularly original, with the erstwhile intellectuals determined to find the killer through interpreting Dante’s work.

Perhaps the most memorable feature of the book is that it encourages the reader to read The Divine Comedy. I’ve previously declared that reading that much poetry in one sitting would be a chore even for me. But Dante’s work seems to be unique. I’m adding it to my reading list, with The Inferno as first in line. Talk about diverting from “light reading”.

Okay… so I’m done with this entry. I’ve said good night to the few important persons in my life more than an hour ago and at least one of them believes that I’m blissfully asleep at the moment–perfectly following my doctor’s directions to SLEEP EARLY. Hehe. Steffi was never very obedient.

And since we’re talking about Dante here…

The Dante’s Inferno Test has banished you to the Seventh Level of Hell!
Here is how you matched up against all the levels:

Level Score
Purgatory (Repenting Believers) Low
Level 1 – Limbo (Virtuous Non-Believers) Very Low
Level 2 (Lustful) Very High
Level 3 (Gluttonous) High
Level 4 (Prodigal and Avaricious) High
Level 5 (Wrathful and Gloomy) Extreme
Level 6 – The City of Dis (Heretics) Low
Level 7 (Violent) Extreme
Level 8- the Malebolge (Fraudulent, Malicious, Panderers) Very High
Level 9 – Cocytus (Treacherous) Moderate

Take the Dante’s Inferno Test

Seventh Level of Hell

Guarded by the Minotaur, who snarls in fury, and encircled within the river Phlegethon, filled with boiling blood, is the Seventh Level of Hell. The violent, the assasins, the tyrants, and the war-mongers lament their pitiless mischiefs in the river, while centaurs armed with bows and arrows shoot those who try to escape their punishment. The stench here is overpowering. This level is also home to the wood of the suicides- stunted and gnarled trees with twisting branches and poisoned fruit. At the time of final judgement, their bodies will hang from their branches. In those branches the Harpies, foul birdlike creatures with human faces, make their nests. Beyond the wood is scorching sand where those who committed violence against God and nature are showered with flakes of fire that rain down against their naked bodies. Blasphemers and sodomites writhe in pain, their tongues more loosed to lamentation, and out of their eyes gushes forth their woe. Usurers, who followed neither nature nor art, also share company in the Seventh Level.

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2 thoughts on “La Divina Commedia

  1. Wow steffi. Wrathful, Gloomy, and Violent!!! Hahaha 😀

    Atleast I’m just a malicious panderer. 😛 JOKE. I’m a level below you pa pala. Haha 😀

  2. pan·der·er (pndr-r)
    n.
    A sexual procurer.
    One who caters to or exploits the lower tastes and desires of others.

    Tricia! You’re a pimp! *LOL* And a fraudulent and malicious one at that. tsk, tsk. =D

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